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Today, In Sentences That Aren’t As Complimentary As You Hoped:

The action (or often lack thereof) taking place in [Tao Lin's Shoplifting from American Apparel] is so everyday slice of life for anyone who can use ‘Beacon’s Closet’ in a sentence, that it produces a sensation in the reader that is not unlike spending an afternoon catching up on your Tumblr dashboard.

Except that, unlike Tumblr, it costs money! BONUS.

7 Comments

  1. Katarin wrote:

    Maybe I’m not literary enough to appreciate but that excerpt sounds both 1) unfunny and 2) boring as all hell. Who would read an entire book written like that?

    Thursday, September 17, 2009 at 12:28 pm | Permalink
  2. @Katarin: hear! hear!
    Makes me wonder if there’s a whole generation roomful of hypnotized and well-connected baby scenesters typing away in a windowless room. Victor’s travelogue voiceover loops endlessly on a reel to reel, volume halfway.

    Thursday, September 17, 2009 at 1:32 pm | Permalink
  3. Isa wrote:

    I uh… what?

    Holy shit, that’s like… 12 seconds of my life that I can never get back.

    Friday, September 18, 2009 at 4:07 am | Permalink
  4. Ashley wrote:

    Luckily, I had to google Beacon’s Closet.

    Friday, September 18, 2009 at 6:15 am | Permalink
  5. C.L. Minou wrote:

    I have *been* to Beacon’s Closet! But luckily I don’t write like that.

    I’m not sure if this gives me hope (“they publish novels that crappy! I know I can do better than that!”) or despair (“the novels they publish have to be that crappy!”)

    Oh the joys of a life of letters…

    Friday, September 18, 2009 at 9:35 am | Permalink
  6. Kelly wrote:

    Sady doesn’t this inspire you to write your own book? It could be a light in the darkness!

    Friday, September 18, 2009 at 9:59 am | Permalink
  7. TheDeviantE wrote:

    you know what that sort of reminded me of? Catcher in the Rye.

    I never saw the genius in that either.
    People being self-absorbed is entertaining?

    Friday, September 18, 2009 at 10:28 pm | Permalink